Jib size - largest possible w/ permanent forestay?

  • October 15, 2011 9:23 AM
    Message # 723521
    Deleted user
    What is the largest size jib sail that I can use without altering the standard original cutter config (staysail boom/forestay as-is)?

    I don't want to lose the staysail, or put on a removable forestay - I just want to increase my sail inventory by one. Currently I have the staysail/Yankee combo that I believe was standard issue. I like it, and enjoy sailing with it.

    I have acquired a huge hank-on genoa, but I am not set up to use it. I am going to cut it down to something I can use.

    Thanks for any suggestions,

    Stephen

  • October 16, 2011 9:35 AM
    Reply # 724105 on 723521
    I'm responding to this more by way of additional questions, than an answer.  I suspect the largest Yankee area is the one the boat was designed to carry, which is what you have now.  The yankee is fairly heavy cloth.  If you  need more sail (light wind), I don't believe a genoa is intended for a cutter rig aand vice-versa because it's tough enough to get the yankee through the slot as it is unless you time it right and let the wind help you.  A large genoa would be nigh impossible.  Instead, maybe a light asymmetric spinnaker would be more appropriate.  But I'll be interested to hear what more experienced light-wind sailors than I am have to say...
  • October 16, 2011 4:22 PM
    Reply # 724256 on 723521
    A lightweight reacher/drifter might be the ticket. That sail will be good up to about
     10 knots and then your yankee/staysail/main will take over nicely..
    I have a lightweight assym but it is not cut flat enough in my opinion...
    although we are still able to get to about 50 apparent. 
    It might be worthwhile to talk to Kern about this.
    I noticed that Dave Kings reacher/drifter seems to be built out of more 
    appropriate 
    material in the right places...unless that is just reinforcing.

    Saraband:



    Elizabeth Ann: Assym with too much belly to use as effective reacher/drifter


    Last modified: October 16, 2011 4:40 PM | Anonymous member
  • October 16, 2011 5:38 PM
    Reply # 724304 on 723521
    Stephen Wylie wrote:What is the largest size jib sail that I can use without altering the standard original cutter config (staysail boom/forestay as-is)?

    I don't want to lose the staysail, or put on a removable forestay - I just want to increase my sail inventory by one. Currently I have the staysail/Yankee combo that I believe was standard issue. I like it, and enjoy sailing with it.

    I have acquired a huge hank-on genoa, but I am not set up to use it. I am going to cut it down to something I can use.

    Thanks for any suggestions,

    Stephen


    I would recommend contacting Dave King or Kern Ferguson to get the very best information.  I know that the standard yankee is 300 sq. ft, and Kern has made a super yankee at 350 or 400 sq. ft. for various owners.

    A genoa does not work well in combination with a staysail on a cutter such as the W32.

     

  • October 17, 2011 11:51 PM
    Reply # 725763 on 723521
    Deleted user

    I have a large genoa made by Westsail;  Luff 41'2"   Foot 25'10"   Leech 39'2"

    It makes all the difference for sailing to windward in winds under 15kts. Off the wind we could carry it in up to 18-20kts. On anything fatter than a close reach we can add the stays'l to give us about another half kt in boat speed. Here's a clip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGVswlhZjLA

    I  have the quick-release forestay and use it if we're tacking alot, but if I only have to tack once or twice, and feeling lazy can get that genoa through the slot with some help from the wind. The super yankee dimensions might be what you're looking for. Aaron compiled a list of sail dimensions and it might be somewhere on this site. Aaron?

    My super yankee is a little smaller than Kern's, but the cut is such that the sheets can be lead between the upper and lower stays getting a flatter trim and closer to the wind.  Here, in 12-15kts.

    Luff 41'6"   Foot 18'2"   Leech 32'8"

     

  • October 18, 2011 12:07 AM
    Reply # 725771 on 723521
    Deleted user

    As long as the luff isn't longer than about 43', or whatever your hoist is, you might want to try the sail first and see how it works as is.

  • October 18, 2011 12:27 PM
    Reply # 726188 on 725763
    Deleted user

    My super yankee is a little smaller than Kern's, but the cut is such that the sheets can be lead between the upper and lower stays getting a flatter trim and closer to the wind.  Here, in 12-15kts.

    Luff 41'6"   Foot 18'2"   Leech 32'8"

    That is exactly what I was thinking of, the super yankee.

    Thanks, I'll start doing some research on that.

    Stephen

     


  • October 26, 2011 1:22 PM
    Reply # 733928 on 723521
    Deleted user

    Got a couple of shots of the big jenny close-hauled in about 5kt wind.

     luff 41'2",  foot 25'10",  leech 39'2

     

     

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